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Keeping your employees and customers safe is a vital part of running a successful business. Guardrails play a significant role in every organizational safety plan and like most commercial facilities, you probably have them in various locations around your workplace. Being familiar with the differences between varying guardrails and their appropriate applications may seem like unimportant trivia. However, staying well versed with OSHA’s expectations and the encompassing needs in your own workplace can be the barrier that stands between you and a nasty violation and potential fine. We’ve put together a quick crash course on the major guardrail variations and industry applications to help you make an informed decision.

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Have myths about the AED machine swayed you against including one in your workplace preparedness plan? Here are the facts about this life-saving device. An AED machine, or automated external defibrillator, is an essential component in first aid and safety. Somehow, though, there remains a knowledge gap that includes many misconceptions.

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Can you call it safety “training” when the information provided is not being retained? The definition of training is the act of teaching a particular skill or type of behavior, and for those that tend to sleep or zone out during the presentation, the chances of them recalling what was covered during the session is low. Even for those who do pay attention during the training, the Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve demonstrates how information is lost over time unless something is done to retain it.

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Out of the 4,386 worker fatalities in private industry during 2014, 899 or 20.5 percent were related to construction, OSHA reports. This means one in five worker deaths in 2014 occurred in construction. More than one worker dies on the job every two hours — across the industries. What’s more visceral: more than 13 workers per day never return home to their loved ones after they report for work in the U.S.

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As providers of safety eyewear, we are often asked about eye health problems of individuals related to computer or tablet usage.  In today’s industry, computer use and use of digital devices is not limited to the office worker, but occurs in every shop floor, laboratory and other production facility.  Manufacturing and industrial operations have computers or other digital screen devices in almost all aspects of their operations.  Workers and employers now have to be concerned with the eye injuries traditionally associated with production and also with the effects of computers which cause Computer Vision Syndrome.

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