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Out of the 4,386 worker fatalities in private industry during 2014, 899 or 20.5 percent were related to construction, OSHA reports. This means one in five worker deaths in 2014 occurred in construction. More than one worker dies on the job every two hours — across the industries. What’s more visceral: more than 13 workers per day never return home to their loved ones after they report for work in the U.S.

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As providers of safety eyewear, we are often asked about eye health problems of individuals related to computer or tablet usage.  In today’s industry, computer use and use of digital devices is not limited to the office worker, but occurs in every shop floor, laboratory and other production facility.  Manufacturing and industrial operations have computers or other digital screen devices in almost all aspects of their operations.  Workers and employers now have to be concerned with the eye injuries traditionally associated with production and also with the effects of computers which cause Computer Vision Syndrome.

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We know behavior is the result of a risk assessment. What we choose to do, how we do it and why is determined by our perception of the potential outcome of our actions. A risk assessment conclusion is further based on a point of view. Your point of view has a significant impact on how and why you draw conclusions. The issue arises when expected outcomes are dependent upon employees making the right choices at the right times. Any process that depends on employee behavior for success is subject to varying degrees of predictable and unpredictable results.

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Visit any household or worksite in the United States and you will, more often than not, spot a ladder. A common and easy-to-use tool, the ladder is applicable in most everyday life situations that require the ability to make contact with objects that are out of reach – from changing light bulbs to window washing, from painting to fixing rooftops, and from cleaning gutters to performing maintenance work.   

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“It’s a busy shop” one worker says to another. “We’re on such a time-crunch to get equipment serviced and back on the road that often there are two to three mechanics working on each piece of equipment.” This scenario is all too common across the industry. When this happens, confusion can take over.  

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It's no secret that roof work is dangerous. As of 2015, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics ranks roofing as the 4th most dangerous civilian occupation based on the rate of fatalities per 100,000 full-time workers. Despite the guidelines laid out and updated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) every year, it's clear that more work is needed to improve safety in roofing projects.

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