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Compared to most people, construction workers are more vulnerable to hazards. For example, falls account for 48.9% of fatal injuries in the private construction sector, according to 2013 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Falls can also cost as much as $106,000 per employee, based on numbers crunched by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Consequently, it's important to implement fall prevention measures in construction sites. You’ll reassure your workers that their lives aren’t at risk, and you can be assured you won’t have to deal with troublesome legal issues.

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Generally, respirators are either categorized as loose-fitting or tight-fitting. Because tight-fitting respirators can’t protect you unless they fit, they're held to tougher standards. OSHA demands respirator fit testing only on tight-fitting respirators, and those respirators that don’t rely on a tight seal around a person’s face do not require testing. 
But just because you know what one is, do you know which one your employees will need?

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In 2015 there were over 37,000 violations in the top 10 alone, meaning too many workers in the United States still risk their lives unnecessarily. More than 20% of those violations involved not meeting fall protection requirements. Not only for employees working on roofs, but also those working on scaffolds. In fact, falls from height were a leading cause of death for construction workers. Last year 381 fatal fall accidents were reported to OSHA, 29 of which involved scaffolding. All those deaths could have been prevented.

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Falls, slips and accidents on the ground can cause enough damage on their own; in the air, these types of hazards are much greater. These 6 tips will help you stay in compliance with OSHA as well as reduce the risk of accidents and serious injuries when working in the air.

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