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When it comes to workplace safety, it’s critical for construction companies to look at what could happen instead of what is (or isn’t) currently happening. Incidents can take place at any time and can happen to anyone. You must not take signs of potential danger lightly. A small crack on the wall or a rusty handle bar might be all it takes to cause a major workplace hazard.

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You have just been offered a position as a welder. The company offers a career that will provide a secure retirement, a competitive wage and training. The only catch is that you may become chronically ill and suffer the golden years in agony, would you take it? According to OSHA, an estimated 5 million workers wear a respirator in 1.3 million workplaces throughout the United States. Respirators are truly our last line of defense. They protect workers from oxygen deficient environments, harmful dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases vapors and sprays.

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July 21, 2016

For the first time since 1990, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) will increase, and then continue to increase, its fine structure to match inflation. Until now, OSHA was specifically exempted from the bill that required federal agencies to raise their fines along with inflation. Fortunately for employers, this meant that as inflation made everything from wages, cost of business and revenue rise, fines didn’t keep up. It would be similar to still paying five bucks to go out to see a movie at the theater. Pretty affordable right? Well as of August 1, that all changes. 

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In the hustle and bustle of getting more done with less, we often tend to concentrate on tasks rather than the individuals doing those tasks. Many companies have a core value of treating people with respect, but this can fall short with the “What have you done for me lately?” mentality that often occurs when meeting goals and objectives, especially on a lean budget. What can we do to change this?

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I was recently contacted by a colleague in the Health and Safety field who posed a very interesting question regarding blame versus culpability. Many organizations have the propensity to blame, to finger point, to find fault in the worker without taking a hard look at the contextual factors surrounding the event.

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