Blog

Workplace health and safety is primarily concerned with physical well-being: protocols focus on making sure employees don’t get strained, cut, smashed, broken, bruised, or physically ill. This is important, but it doesn’t address what may be the root of the problem: poor mental health. And it doesn’t recognize that mental well-being on its own falls under the workplace health and safety umbrella, and has a huge impact on work life.

Add a comment

After a week of multiple training sessions, I was exhausted. I returned my car rental and arrived at the airport five hours early to relax before a red eye flight home. Being a seasoned traveler, I watched the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) lines to decide which one to move into. The line I was in came to halt, so when I saw a gap in the line next to me, I took the opportunity to move over (for non-seasoned travelers, you can switch lines if you’re not cutting people off). Then, from behind me: “Really?” I didn’t realize the voice was talking to me until it was next to my ear, louder and more agitated. “Really?!” It was the woman behind me, a stranger.

Add a comment

Asbestos has a long history in the United States and around the world. Even though its negative health impacts were confirmed early into the 1920s, the mineral was heavily used through the 1970s in a myriad of applications. Today in the United States, it can still be legally used in small traces across certain products with a historic use. Past uses of asbestos leads to the toxin still existing in various products, vehicles, homes, public infrastructures, and other sites across the globe.

Add a comment

Earlier this summer, United States President Donald Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jung Un, met for a historic talk. But they were not alone in the room. Each leader had their own interpreter tasked with translating between the two men—accurately relaying every word with the correct context and expression.

Add a comment

Did you know that the average workplace desk can be a 100 times less hygienic than your average kitchen table and more than 400 times dirtier than a toilet seat? Taking these shocking statistics into consideration it is no wonder that working individuals are exceedingly prone to illness. Productivity losses due to absenteeism cost employers as much as $22.8 billion annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  

Add a comment